The Masha Art show celebrates intrigue and introspection with panache

Masha Art, a recent exhibition in Gurugram brought together 18 leading women artists who displayed a spectacular range of paintings, sculptures and ceramics

An assembly of 18 leading women artists came together for a spectacular and stirring rendition of paintings, sculptures and ceramics in the “I have a dream” exhibition at Masha Art, in Gurugram. The medley of 25 artworks made for a stunning compilation of textures

There is both intrigue and introspection in the cornucopia that lines the transitional space. “The show is about women the world over. It brings to our mind the song by Abba, and also the words of Martin Luther King in today’s age when there is a colossal movement –  Black Lives Matter – in progress. “I have a dream” is about women artists who create in their own solitude. It is a karmic journey for me as I believe the curator is a bridge between collectors and artists,” shares Uma Nair, the curator. Textures and colours are integral to the creations: in Jayasri Burman’s Shringar 1, a bronze sculpture; Nutan Pandit’s Untitled work in a modernist version inspired by Swiss sculptor Alberto Giacometti; Jyotsna Bhatt’s 20 year old ceramic ware, Leena Batra’s platters, seminal abstract artists as well as Seema Koli’s Ganesha, Arpitha Reddy’s Kalpavriksha and artworks by Chaitali Chanda, Gogi Saroj Pal, Milburn Cherian, Nupur Kundu, Prabha Shah, Ranjeeta Kant, Rini Dhumal, Rita Datta, Sangeeta Gupta, Saraswati, Sonia Sareen, Sujata Bajaj and Vasundra Tewari Broota. The unifying thread is a celebration of the identity of the woman artist, transcending both time and tradition.

Masha Art, a recent exhibition in Gurugram brought together 18 leading women artists who displayed a spectacular range of paintings, sculptures and ceramics

The dancing forms on the ceramic platters by Leena Batra bring in fluidity of motion in the black and white lines within the perimeter. Rini Dhumal’s whorls, curves and ruminations in leafy triads are evocative of the ochre calm within. Milburn’s Golden Baubles, and Gamblers, are evocative of the fantastical with an eccentric spray of fingers, playing cards, and golden balls. Patrini by Sonia Sareen wears a sense of beatific calm in the trellis and Sujata Bajaj’s Colour Fields celebrate a vivid run of colours in flowing lines and spontaneous geometrics while Rita Datta’s Meditation Bronze is exudes an aura of calm and sheer repose

Dedicated to the freedom of spirit of women artists in India, the show is a rich tribute to potter Jyotsna Bhatt and printmaker artist Rini Dhumal – two iconic gurus of MS University Baroda who passed away. “This is a small tribute to the beauty of a woman creating in her own oasis of solitude. The world has millions of stories about women artists who struggle to find a style that matches their vision. The show brings in women artists who have found their own pictorial freedom,” says Uma. “The art work that stirs me the most is Kamadhenu, as I love the bovine. 

Shilpi Madan for Sunday Herald

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