“It has been many years since 2000 when I nosedived into mindfulness after my facial paralysis and subsequent recovery. I owe my peace and calm very much to that. I learnt very quickly that every illness is connected to our thought patterns.”

Singer Raageshwari Loomba changed the way she looked at life, to overcome endometriosis and Bell’s Palsy at the peak of her career as a popstar. In 2000, she was diagnosed with endometriosis and a retroverted uterus. A born fighter, Raageshwari bounced back to take on every challenge head-on. She conceived naturally, a result, she believes, of positive thinking, turning mommy at 40. “I remember being a happy person, always, but I was unaware of the true power of positivity until then,” she says. Now mother to beautiful Samaya, 3, Raageshwari is busy bringing up her young one with love. Excerpts from the conversation:

There is a sense of beatific calm about you. How do you manage that?

It has been many years since 2000 when I nosedived into mindfulness after my facial paralysis and subsequent recovery. I owe my peace and calm very much to that. I learnt very quickly that every illness is connected to our thought patterns. So I did massive inner work and today I very rarely get cross. Once you make the choice of ‘good thoughts’ a habit, it shows in your life and definitely your face. It’s not a miracle but a science.

How does your day pan out?

I’m up at 4.30 am and sleep by 9.30 pm. I have a detailed timetable and truly, that liberates me and brings more power into a day. My visible work may be very sporadic right now but I’m actually working every day.

You have managed to structure your work around Samaya…

Yes. At 5 am, I start life-coaching with my clients (online or personal one-on-ones). By 7 am, I take a break to wake up my husband and Samaya. Breakfast and school drop-off ends by 9 am. I run and workout till 10 am. Then at 10.30 am, I start work again till school pickup. It could be an event or simply hosting a seminar. So the day breezes past but I get a lot done, simply because of a time-table. People underestimate time-tables as they remind them of school (laughs).

Shilpi Madan for Indian Express

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