Jewellery designer Roma Narsinghani delights with practical, playful pieces in ‘Sundays are for love’

jewellery designer Roma Narsinghani explores the boundaries of brass with a whimsical new collection.

Her sculptural designs mirror her eclectic take on contours in metal. Jewellery designer Roma Narsinghani delights with practical yet playful pieces in her collection titled, Sundays Are for Love. “This collection is defined by private moments with yourself or shared by those you feel appreciated by—those brief, unnameable instances where everything fits, no doubts or questions exist, and all seems safe and good,” says Narsinghani.  “I chose the name because my husband and I both work almost six days a week. We spend Sundays with our beagle, Bella, staying in bed late, watching a movie, and ordering in yummy food. Sundays are always for love,” says the designer, an alumnus of Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design and the London College of Fashion in the UK, who launched her eponymous brand after working with fashion designer, Manish Arora.

Jewellery, she says, has always had a close connection with intimacy. You will find it in all senses —smell, touch, taste, sight and hearing. But also, in the places where a piece of jewellery is worn, invisible inside a shirt or conspicuously with a secret message on the back, against the skin. “We self-soothe through massages or long warm baths. Occasionally, we sleep in on a Sunday, with our partners. Each is an expression of embodying our vulnerable and naked self. My vision was to prioritise these tactical experiences and stories of love to convey that nothing is better than a touch on the shoulder or hug that wordlessly conveys: I see you. I care about you. I’m excited to be with you. We are in this together,” Narsinghani adds. 

Jewellery designer Roma Narsinghani explores the boundaries of brass with a whimsical new collection.

The essence of her campaign for the new collection stems from her holding dear all that is made with love. Handmade artisanal trinkets in brass, ruby studded hair cages, gold bindis, Swarovski hairbands and scarf chokers abound. Wearable anywhere, each piece transports your senses around the world. “Brass can be recycled, and its malleability lends itself to my design aesthetics. Also, when we think of metal, words that come to mind are hard, heavy and lustrous. I wanted to challenge this to see if we could create pieces showcasing metal in a way that is soft and fluid, which is why treating it like the fabric was new and ex- citing for me. To make it more textile-like, we decided to embellish the scarf with Swarovski crystals to create a pixel art tartan pattern,” she explains, sharing the making of her scarf choker. 

Shilpi Madan for The Sunday Standard

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